Sue Boss

Work Injury FAQ

What if I don’t want to sue my boss for injuries at work?

When initially taking calls about work injury cases in Maryland, one of the major concerns that most injured workers have is the relationship that they have with their employer, their boss, or other coworkers. To an outsider of the worker’s compensation system, this is a very valid question. In today’s job market it is still not incredibly easy to get a job. The last thing you want to do is ad insult to injury(literally) and get fired because of making a claim against your employer.

The first important thing that you must know is: Filing a worker’s compensation claim in Maryland is NOT suing your employer, your boss, or anyone you work with who was involved with your injury.

The Maryland Worker’s Compensation section of the law is designed to take the lawsuit aspect out of the work injury recovery process, and create a less adversarial environment for handling such injury claims. While there are still opportunities for disagreement and an adversarial hearing process between your lawyer and the lawyers for your employer’s insurance company, it is often less directly involved with the employer. Many of the non-disputed claims never see the inside of the commission’s hearing rooms for any significantly contested issues.

It is also important to know that an employer cannot fire you for filing an injury claim. This type of retaliation is unlawful, and if an employer is proven to have discharged an employee due to the filing of a work injury claim the penalties for doing so can be significant.

If you have been injured at work, you should have an advocate like us to help guide through the process. Call us now at (410) 885-6200 to discuss our representation in these matters. In work injury cases, we accept no upfront fees, and our office only gets paid when we win benefits for you. We are happy to answer any other questions you may have, guide you through the worker’s compensation process, and fight hard to secure the proper benefits that you are owed as a result of your work-related injury.